Posts for tag: Heartburn

By Mid-Valley Gastroenterology
July 12, 2021
Category: GI Care
Tags: Heartburn   Ginger   Upset Stomach   Digestion   Bloating  
GingerGinger is a great spice to keep in your pantry because it is chock full of antioxidants that help combat oxidative stress and may also reduce the risk for lung disease, heart disease, and hypertension. If you’ve ever dealt with a stomachache or a bout of nausea before then you’ve probably heard people say to eat some ginger or sip ginger tea. Is there something to ginger that can actually help your stomach when it’s being topsy-turvy?

Here are some ways in which ginger could help your gut.

It Could Aid in Digestion

Whether your stomach is upset upon waking or you just tried a more adventurous dish at a new restaurant, there are many reasons why your stomach might be feeling a little unhappy. Fortunately, ginger can be a helpful and natural remedy to ease that upset stomach.

How? Ginger is believed to speed up the movement of food through the GI tract, while also protecting the gut. It may also ease bloating, cramping, and gas. If you are dealing with an upset stomach, you may want to boil some fresh ginger or add a little ground ginger to some hot water.

It May Protect Against Heartburn

If you find yourself dealing with that gnawing, burning in your chest, ginger may also keep these problems at bay (or, at the very least, alleviate them). Ginger doesn’t just boost motility of the intestinal tract, it may also protect the gastric lining while reducing stomach acid from flowing back up the esophagus after meals.

It Stops Bloat

Most people will experience bloating at some point, particularly after eating. Whether from overheating or from food intolerance, bloating could be alleviated by drinking ginger tea or eating dried ginger. Indigestion is one of the top reasons for bloating, and ginger has the ability to reduce indigestion, which in turn can stop bloat from happening in the first place. People who are prone to bloating may want to add ground ginger to their morning cup of tea or water to prevent this problem from happening during the day.

It’s important not to ignore ongoing stomach problems. If abdominal pain and cramping, or other intestinal problems keep plaguing you, then it’s time to see a gastroenterologist to find out what’s going on. While natural remedies such as ginger can be helpful for minor and fleeting bouts of nausea and an upset stomach, they won’t be able to treat more serious stomach issues.
By Mid-Valley Gastroenterology
October 05, 2020
Category: GI Care
Foods That Help Combat HeartburnMost of us have dealt with a bout of heartburn before; however, there are many Americans that deal with frequent heartburn that makes it difficult to enjoy mealtimes. Whether your heartburn is the result of acid reflux or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), you must see a gastroenterologist if you are experiencing heartburn multiple times a week.

If you’re dealing with heartburn, one of the first things your gastroenterologist will examine is your diet. While certain foods can exacerbate heartburn and make it worse, certain foods can improve and ease acid reflux symptoms. Some of these foods include:

Oatmeal

Foods that are high in fiber such as oatmeal aren’t just amazing for your digestive tract, they may also prevent heartburn from brewing in the first place. Plus, whole grain foods can help satiate your appetite for longer, which means that you are less likely to go for snacks and other foods that could cause a nasty bout of acid reflux. So, start your morning right with a hearty bowl of oatmeal. And perhaps you may even want to add a….

Banana

Just like vegetables, a banana is a low-acid and high alkaline fruit that is also great for the digestive tract. If you battle with heartburn, bananas can help prevent stomach acid production while also helping things run smoothly through the digestive system.

Ginger

Whether you prefer ginger sprinkled into your morning smoothie, a soothing cup of ginger tea or fresh ginger grated into your water, this magical vegetable reduces inflammation and can aid in preventing and treating heartburn as well as calm an upset stomach and ease nausea.

Leafy Greens and Veggies

Fibrous vegetables such as spinach, broccoli, potatoes, and asparagus are alkaline, which helps to keep stomach acid in check. This is also because these delicious and nutritious foods are low in sugar and fat, which means they are friends to those with heartburn.

Yogurt

We all know that yogurt has amazing probiotic properties, providing your gut with the good bacteria it needs to stay healthy and strong. Good bacteria can also improve how your immune system functions, staving off germs and infections, while also coating and easing stomach acid.

Whether you have questions about your current heartburn-friendly diet or you’re having trouble getting your acid reflux under control, a gastroenterologist will be able to provide you with proper long-term medication and lifestyle changes that can help.
By Mid-Valley Gastroenterology
June 05, 2020
Category: digestive health
Tags: Heartburn  
HeartburnWhen the natural stomach acid produced during digestion reaches your esophagus, it causes what is known as Heartburn or Acid Reflux. It feels like stomach or chest pain, or possibly a burning sensation. You’ve most likely experienced this at some point in your life. It’s a common occurrence after eating very large meals or greasy foods. It’s only when you have heartburn all the time or every meal that you need to see a gastroenterologist.
 
Treatment for Mild Heartburn
Your gastroenterologist starts by focusing on your symptoms. These concentrate on prevention, with certain diet and lifestyle changes. You need to first start by evaluating what you eat. 
 
Avoid these foods if you suffer from heartburn:
  • Chocolate
  • Greasy and fatty foods
  • Mint
  • Spicy foods
  • Onions
  • Garlic
Antacids are over-the-counter stomach acid reducers that help when experiencing bouts of heartburn.
 
There are also risk factors for experiencing heartburn, including being overweight, smoking, pregnancy, and excessive alcohol intake.
 
Following certain guidelines is the ideal way to keep your heartburn at bay. These include eating smaller meals on a more frequent basis, avoiding lying down after eating, wearing loose clothing, and avoiding activities that involve bending down or lifting.
 
Heartburn as an Indicator of GERD
If heartburn is left to progress without intervention, it develops into gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). You need to stop severe heartburn complications in their tracks. Otherwise, they result in severe inflammation and ulceration of the esophagus, scarring, and Barrett's esophagus. Cancer becomes a possibility without the help of a gastroenterologist. 
 
Treatment for GERD 
Treatment is a mixture of the preventive measures listed above alongside pharmaceuticals. Your gastroenterologist may prescribe medications known as PPIs or H2 blockers. These work to stop the overproduction of acid in the stomach. Alginate drugs are another option. They create a barrier within the stomach that protects it from stomach acid. 
 
Antacids are the most popular and common over-the-counter treatment for heartburn. They provide a short-term reduction of stomach acidity. There are dozens of different brands and types of antacids. This includes formats like liquid, gels, and regular pills. 
 
Consider contacting a gastroenterologist if you experience throat problems like soreness, pain when swallowing, nauseous, wheezing, a persistent cough, and bad breath. These are other common symptoms of GERD. 
By Mid-Valley Gastroenterology
December 06, 2018
Category: Gastroenterology
Tags: Heartburn  

Got heartburn? Heartburn, also known as acid indigestion, is a form of indigestion felt as a burning pain in the chest. It's caused when stomach acid flows up into your esophagus. More than just a minor discomfort, acid indigestion can reduce quality of life. The following tips will help you rid yourself of heartburn.

1. Change your diet. Stay away from beverages and foods that commonly cause heartburn. A good way to work out what beverages and foods trigger your heartburn symptoms is to keep track of what you eat. Common offenders include tea, coffee, tomatoes, garlic, fatty foods, spicy foods, milk, chocolate and peppermint. 

2. Don't overeat. Overeating can trigger heartburn. Big meals put pressure on the muscle that helps keep stomach contents from backing up into the esophagus. The more food you eat, the longer it takes for your stomach to empty, which contributes to acid reflux. Try eating five small meals a day to keep reflux at bay.

3. Avoid alcohol. Alcohol can trigger heartburn. Alcohol can relax the sphincter muscle at the lower end of your esophagus, causing stomach acid to flow up into your esophagus If your aim is to unwind after a long day at work, try exercise, stretching, listening to soothing music, or deep breathing instead of drinking alcohol.

4. Lose weight. If you overeat, lose weight- but be sure to consult your doctor before starting a vigorous exercise program. The increased risk of heartburn is thought to be due to excess abdominal fat causing pressure on the stomach.

5. Stop smoking. Nicotine is a muscle relaxant. Nicotine can relax the sphincter muscle, causes acid from the stomach to leak upward into the esophagus. Nicotine gums, patches, and lozenges are healthier and safer than cigarettes, and they are less likely to give you heartburn. 

6. Contact your doctor. Your doctor may suggest antacids for occasional heartburn. Sometimes, more powerful prescription medications such as proton pump inhibitors or H2 blockers and are needed to treat chronic heartburn. When all else fails, surgery may be required to repair the LES.

Chronic heartburn can affect your daily activities and make life frustrating and miserable. Don't hesitate to contact a gastroenterologist about heartburn.



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